Dental Implants PDF Print E-mail
A dental implant is a "root" device, usually made of titanium, used in dentistry to support restorations that resemble a tooth or group of teeth to replace missing teeth.

Virtually all dental implants placed today are root-form endosseous implants, in that they appear similar to an actual tooth root (and thus possess a "root-form") and are placed within the bone. The bone of the jaw accepts and osseointegrates with the titanium post. Osseointegration refers to the fusion of the implant surface with the surrounding bone. This is what makes the implant resemble the look and feel of a natural tooth. Dental implants can also be used to support a number of dental prostheses, including crowns, implant-supported bridges or dentures.

First, your options will be discussed with the dentist.  Together, it will be decided if you are a good candidate for dental implants.  The dentist will take a complete dental history, x-rays, and complete a thorough oral examination. 

Procedure:

The gum tissue is opened to expose the bone area where the implant will be placed. In situations where there is insufficient bone structure, bone grafting may be a recommended procedure. Once healthy bone material has been established, a special drill is used to prepare the bone to receive the implant. After the bone has been prepared, the implant is placed and the tissue is sutured.

The healing process takes three to six months. This is the amount of time it usually takes the implant to become part of the lower jaw. The sutures are typically removed however, seven to fourteen days after surgery. When the gum tissue is ready, a special post is attached to the implant. It is the support for the new porcelain crown.

After impressions are taken a crown is made and shaded to match your existing teeth. The crown is then slipped over the post and cemented.

 

Last Updated ( Wednesday, 20 July 2011 )